Arthritis: Seven early signs of rheumatoid arthritis to spot to prevent disability


While there’s no cure for rheumatoid arthritis, the disease can be managed with medication and exercise to prevent life-long deformities. How can you get a diagnosis? Johns Hopkins Medicine stated the “skeletal system”, bodily organs and joints can be affected by the autoimmune disorder. Diagnosing the condition can be difficult in the beginning as symptoms can be very mild.

However, be on the lookout for signs of inflammation across the body, such as painful joints.

The most commonly affected areas include:

  • The hands
  • The feet
  • The ankles
  • The knows
  • The shoulders
  • The elbows

Any stiffness of the joints need to be noted, especially if it appears first thing in the morning.

Furthermore, swollen joints may come and go and there might be small bumps on the joints, or you might notice a decrease in movement ability.

READ MORE: Arthritis symptoms: Three ‘mystery’ signs of painful arthritis 

Blood tests can identify rheumatoid factor or cyclic citrullinated antibodies, which are inflammatory markers.

If diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, it’s important to work with your healthcare provider to devise a treatment plan.

This will be unique to you, depending on a number of factors, such as:

  • Age
  • Overall health
  • Medical history
  • Tolerance to medicines, treatments, or therapies
  • Your preference

Medicines may be used to treat pain and inflammation, and to slow the progression of the disease.

Splints might be utilised to protect the joints and strengthen weak joints.

In further advanced cases, where deformities have arisen, surgery is an option.

“Surgical cleaning” removes inflamed and diseased tissue in the hands to help increase functionality.

Arthroplasty might be considered to replace worn and damaged joints with an artificial joint made out of metal, plastic, or silicone rubber.



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