'Atomic message' White House drenched in radioactive blood- US steps toward 'annihilation'


On Tuesday, Russian artist Andrei Molodkin and Japanese noise musicians Makoto and Yutaka Sakamoto will present their artwork “Atomic Message” to commemorate the Nagasaki atomic bomb which was dropped on the Japanese city by the US on August 9, 1945. The Atomic Message includes a blood-soaked sculpture of the White House as part of an eight-hour video and sound installation in the Nagasaki Prefecture Art Museum, communicating the intense suffering of innocent civilians as a result of war. Born and raised in Nagasaki, Makoto and his family have donated their blood to Mr Molodkin’s artwork of the White House, the symbol of Western democracy.

Two generations on from when the bomb struck 77 years ago, the blood continues to spread a message to deter nuclear strike: a bloodline of radioactivity.

The repercussions of the atomic bomb attacks have been long-standing, with radiation handed down through generations, prompting birth defects as well as cancer and other health problems.

The stark reminder of the fallout from nuclear war comes as tensions rocket between the global superpowers.

Russian artist Mr Molodkin told Express.co.uk: “Last week UN secretary-general Antonio Guterres warned we are ‘one miscalculation away from nuclear annihilation’.

“The US has encircled China with over 400 military bases and is conducting nuclear war games less than 100 miles from St Petersburg.

“Apocalyptic rhetoric from nuclear-armed nations has never been more intense.

“This installation is a warning about the shocking reality of nuclear war and the human cost to innocent civilians.

“It is a warning that these ‘miscalculations’ are in fact calculated decisions to further Imperialist agendas.”

The lives of somewhere between 60,000 and 80,000 people were tragically claimed in Nagasaki.

While some perished straightaway, others died of radiation exposure, or from burns or injuries in the months following the attack.

The bomb came just three days after another Japanese city Hiroshima was obliterated in the wake of America detonating another atomic weapon there.

Mr Sakamoto explained: “Our grandfather experienced the atomic bomb at the age of 13, having to walk 50 kilometres through a hellish landscape.

“He said that many children survived only because of their small size.

“A whole generation was left without their parents who were knocked down and killed by the blast.”

The installation will strike a chord with many around the world who feel anxious at the spike in nuclear rhetoric and aggressive actions.

Speaking at the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) conference in New York last week, Mr Guterres warned that the world faced a nuclear danger not seen since the height of the cold war.

Tensions are bubbling across the globe, from Russia’s war with Ukraine to Chinese military drills around Taiwan and tensions on the Korean peninsula and in the Middle East.

Mr Guterres said: “We have been extraordinarily lucky so far. But luck is not a strategy. Nor is it a shield from geopolitical tensions boiling over into nuclear conflict. [World leaders must] put humanity on a new path towards a world free of nuclear weapons”.

Almost 13,000 nuclear weapons are now being held in arsenals around the world.

US President Joe Biden has stated his administration is preparing to “expeditiously negotiate” a replacement to New Start, the treaty capping intercontinental nuclear forces in the United States and Russia, which is set to expire in 2026.

With sentiment echoing these ambitions, Mr Molodkin added: “The atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were warnings from the US to the Soviet Union at the time.

“An atomic message between politicians that killed hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians.

“This artwork is a message to world leaders to remember the human cost of war.”



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