Marilyn Manson DROPPED by longtime manager after sexual abuse allegations from Evan Rachel Wood


Marilyn Manson’s manager Tony Ciulla has now dropped the rocker as a client after working with him for more than two decades.

Ciulla recently severed ties with the 52-year-old shock rocker in the wake of allegations from multiple women that he sexually and physically abused them, Rolling Stone reported on Friday.

The actress Evan Rachel Wood, 33, the most prominent of the women, claimed Manson was her abuser after having spoken about the figure anonymously in 2019 while advocating for legislation to extend the statute of limitations for domestic violence.

Severed ties: Marilyn Manson's manager Tony Ciulla has dropped the rocker as a client after working with him for more than two decades, Rolling Stone reported on Friday; seen at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in February 2020

Severed ties: Marilyn Manson’s manager Tony Ciulla has dropped the rocker as a client after working with him for more than two decades, Rolling Stone reported on Friday; seen at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in February 2020

Ciulla’s 25-year collaboration with Manson (real name: Brian Warner) began in 1996 with the release of his breaththrough sophomore album Antichrist Superstar.

The LP, which blended industrial music with hard-edged metal, earned positive reviews from critics and became a commercial success after reaching number three on the Billboard 200 chart.

Ciulla was seemingly immune to past legal threats to Manson, including lawsuits launched by his former bandmates.

The musician was swept up in controversy following the 1999 Columbine High School shooting after the gunmen Eric Harris and Dyland Klebold were reported to have been fans of Manson’s music.

The reports were false, but religious institutions and social conservatives escalated their campaigns against his music in the wake of the school shooting.

Longtime associate: Ciulla (L) began a 25-year collaboration with Manson (real name: Brian Warner) in 1996 with the release of his breakthrough sophomore album Antichrist Superstar; seen in 2013

Longtime associate: Ciulla (L) began a 25-year collaboration with Manson (real name: Brian Warner) in 1996 with the release of his breakthrough sophomore album Antichrist Superstar; seen in 2013

Hit record: The LP earned positive reviews from critics and became a commercial success after reaching number three on the Billboard 200 chart

Hit record: The LP earned positive reviews from critics and became a commercial success after reaching number three on the Billboard 200 chart

Ciulla, who hasn’t commented on the abuse allegations against his client, dropped Manson after Woods publicly named him on social media earlier this week, a source said.

‘The name of my abuser is Brian Warner, also known to the world as Marilyn Manson,’ the Kajillionaire star wrote on Instagram on Monday.

‘He started grooming me when I was a teenager and horrifically abused me for years. I was brainwashed and manipulated into submission,’ she continued.

‘I am done living in fear of retaliation, slander, or blackmail. I am here to expose this dangerous man and call out the many industries that have enabled him before he ruins any more lives. I stand with the many victims who will no longer be silent.’

Four other women joined Wood with their own statements about Manson’s alleged abuse on Monday, and other women have subsequently accused him of abuse.

The rocker’s most recent record label, Loma Vista, also dropped him earlier this week. 

Instigating incident: Ciulla, who hasn't commented on the abuse allegations, dropped Manson after his ex-fiancée Evan Rachel Wood accused him of sexual abuse on Monday; Wood and Manson seen in 2007 in Cologne, Germany

Instigating incident: Ciulla, who hasn’t commented on the abuse allegations, dropped Manson after his ex-fiancée Evan Rachel Wood accused him of sexual abuse on Monday; Wood and Manson seen in 2007 in Cologne, Germany

Setting the record straight: Wood previously mentioned an unnamed abuser during her 2018 testimony in front of a House Judiciary Subcommittee, and she later clarified that it was Manson

Setting the record straight: Wood previously mentioned an unnamed abuser during her 2018 testimony in front of a House Judiciary Subcommittee, and she later clarified that it was Manson

Wood previously mentioned an unnamed abuser during her 2018 testimony in front of a House Judiciary Subcommittee while trying to get the Sexual Assault Survivors’ Bill of Rights passed across the nation.

‘My experience with domestic violence was this: Toxic mental, physical and sexual abuse which started slow but escalated over time, including threats against my life, severe gaslighting and brainwashing, waking up to the man that claimed to love me raping what he believed to be my unconscious body,’ she said.

Manson posted a denial to Instagram shortly after Wood shared her statement.

‘Obviously, my art and my life have long been magnets for controversy, but these recent claims about me are horrible distortions of reality,’ he wrote.

‘My intimate relationships have always been entirely consensual with like-minded partners. Regardless of how — and why — others are now choosing to misrepresent the past, that is the truth.’

Denial: Manson posted a denial to Instagram shortly after Wood shared her statement. 'Obviously, my art and my life have long been magnets for controversy, but these recent claims about me are horrible distortions of reality,' he wrote; seen in 2019

Denial: Manson posted a denial to Instagram shortly after Wood shared her statement. ‘Obviously, my art and my life have long been magnets for controversy, but these recent claims about me are horrible distortions of reality,’ he wrote; seen in 2019

Pushing back: 'My intimate relationships have always been entirely consensual with like-minded partners. Regardless of how — and why — others are now choosing to misrepresent the past, that is the truth,' he continued

Pushing back: ‘My intimate relationships have always been entirely consensual with like-minded partners. Regardless of how — and why — others are now choosing to misrepresent the past, that is the truth,’ he continued

In a 2009 interview with Spin, Manson said of Wood: ‘I have fantasies every day about smashing her skull in with a sledgehammer.’

However, a representative for the rocker downplayed the comment in 2020 to Louder, claiming that it was ‘obviously a theatrical rock star interview promoting a new record, and not a factual account.’

In 2018, The Hollywood Reporter wrote that a police report had been filed against Manson over sex crimes that allegedly took place in 2011. 

However, the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office opted not to pursue the charges later that summer due to a lack of evidence.

‘The allegations made to the police were and are categorically denied by Mr. Warner and are either completely delusional or part of a calculated attempt to generate publicity for the claimant’s business of selling Manson memorabilia,’ said Manson’s attorney Howard E. King at the time.

‘The police report that spurred the investigation was accompanied by the woman’s press release and other attempts to generate publicity that fraudulently claimed she was held captive by Mr. Warner for 48 hours in 2011. Any claim of sexual impropriety or imprisonment at that, or any other, time is false.’

Receipts: In a 2009 interview with Spin , Manson said of Wood: 'I have fantasies every day about smashing her skull in with a sledgehammer,' though a representative claimed it was a 'theatrical' statement more than a decade later; seen together in 2007

Receipts: In a 2009 interview with Spin , Manson said of Wood: ‘I have fantasies every day about smashing her skull in with a sledgehammer,’ though a representative claimed it was a ‘theatrical’ statement more than a decade later; seen together in 2007

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