Russia's 'doomsday machine' could submerge Ukraine under 330-foot tsunami in minutes


Russia is believed to possess a nuclear superweapon that could destroy cities within minutes. Putin’s “doomsday machine”, designed to destroy naval bases, has the potential to drown Ukraine instantly under a 330-foot high tsunami. Scientists warn that such destruction can be achieved by detonating a nuclear warhead underwater, near the sea coast.

Revealed by Putin in 2018, the Poseidon is an underwater, unmanned stealth drone which is capable of launching nuclear payloads.

The submarine comes equipped with 2-megaton nuclear warhead torpedoes, which are said to be capable of creating 330-foot tall tsunamis.

The torpedoes, which can hurtle through the water undetected at 80 mph, are designed to destroy enemy naval bases in an instant.

Putin claimed that the subs have “hardly any vulnerabilities” and carry a “massive nuclear ordinance”.

He said: “There is simply nothing in the world capable of withstanding them.”

Scientists have warned that underwater nuclear torpedos could trigger massive tsunamis.

Physicist Rex Richardson told Business Insider: “A well-placed nuclear weapon of yield in the range 20 megatons to 50 megatons near a sea coast could certainly couple enough energy to equal the 2011 tsunami, and perhaps much more.

“Taking advantage of the rising-sea-floor amplification effect, tsunami waves reaching 100 metres [330 feet] in height are possible.”

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Dmitry Polyanskiy, Russia’s deputy ambassador to the UN, issued a chilling warning on Wednesday, stating: “We are a nuclear power, why not?”

Putin’s spokesperson said on Tuesday the Russian President could use nuclear weapons to see off an “existential threat”.

Russia currently possesses the largest nuclear stockpile in the world, with over 6000 nuclear warheads.

Russia’s leader had already heightened nuclear tensions shortly after invading Ukraine – putting Russia’s nuclear capabilities on “special alert” on February 27.

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He claimed the move was in response to “aggressive statements” made by the NATO alliance, which had reacted with outrage to the invasion.

The day after troops moved in on Ukraine, NATO leaders said in a statement that it was a “terrible strategic mistake, for which Russia will pay a severe price, both economically and politically, for years to come”.

Russia further raised alarm when it said any countries which might allow Ukraine to use its airfields for attack runs – including nearby NATO countries – would be counted as belligerents.



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